BFI – BBC’s Classic Ghost Stories Available Finally on DVD

 

Posted on the BFI website on April 25th…

The BFI is to make the complete series of the BBC’s classic Ghost Stories finally available on DVD this year.

 

These much-loved tales terrified BBC TV audiences at Christmas throughout the 1970s. Most of the instalments were directed by Lawrence Gordon Clark and based on M.R. James’s celebrated supernatural stories.

With only three of the twelve BBC Ghost Stories previously released on DVD (by the BFI in 2002), the films in this brilliant series have been high on many film and TV fans’ ‘most wanted’ DVD lists.

The films are a key influence on recent British ghost and horror films, including The Woman in Black, and have inspired many screenwriters and filmmakers including Mark Gatiss (The League of Gentlemen, Sherlock).

The first two volumes will be released in August 2012 in celebration of the 150th anniversary of M.R. James’s birth. Two more volumes will follow in September, while the fifth and final volume, as well as a complete Ghost Stories for Christmas box set, will follow in October.

Volume One includes two versions of the chilling Whistle And I’ll Come To You: Jonathan Miller’s 1968 adaptation, starring Michael Hordern, and the 2010 re-imagining, starring John Hurt.

Volume Two includes The Stalls of Barchester (1971), starring Robin Hardy, and A Warning to the Curious (1972), starring Peter Vaughan, as well as Christopher Lee’s Ghost Stories for Christmas: The Stalls of Barchester (2000)

More from that news article at this link

Order the box-set now at THIS LINK

The Black Panther

Note: In the 1980s, The Black Panther was released for rental on VHS. This video trailer was targeted at a rental audience at that time and is not the original theatrical trailer.

Directed by Ian Merrick, this intelligent crime drama charts the infamous killing spree which Donald Neilson, aka the Black Panther, perpetrated across England during the mid-70s, culminating in the kidnapping and death of a 17-year-old girl. Told with uncommon accuracy and refraining from any measure of sensationalism, this fascinating and disturbing film fell foul of a media-driven campaign upon its original cinema release, which resulted in an effective ban.